Lookalikes to Look out for – No. 2. – Mexichromis pusilla & Verconia varians

Lookalikes to Look out for – No. 2. – Mexichromis pusilla & Verconia varians

Mexichromis pusilla – Verconia varians In No. 2 of this series Mexichromis pusilla (Bergh, 1874) and Verconia varians (Pease,1871) will be discussed. Both species were described back in the 19th century and have gone through a couple of name changes. The original genus for both was Chromodoris. There had been much confusion in the literature
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FOUR AND MORE INTO ONE – Variation in Miamira moloch

FOUR AND MORE INTO ONE – Variation in Miamira moloch

Miamira moloch is a large to very large nudibranch of the Chromdorididae Family. It was first described as Ceratosoma moloch in 1988 by Rudman from two specimens, one collected from Heron Island, Central Queensland and the other from North Stradbroke Island, Southern Queensland. At first glance the specimens in the above montage all appear to
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Lookalikes to look out for – No. 1

Lookalikes to look out for – No. 1

Sometimes when reviewing images post-dive it’s easy to overlook an uncommon species if it has a similar appearance to a species that is frequently sighted. We know the common one well but have forgotten about the rarer one that looks similar – The Lookalike. This NudiNote will discuss a not-so-common species – Verconia decussata (Risbec,1928)
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SIX SEPARATE SOCKETS – Hexabranchus

SIX SEPARATE SOCKETS – Hexabranchus

Hexabranchus sanguineus The name says it all. It has six gills – Hexabranchus, and is blood-coloured – sanguineus. This species was originally described from the Red Sea. Specimens from that region are not red and white mottled as in the images posted here but are a deep and uniform “blood” colour. This nudibranch, also known
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UNIQUELY UNITED BUT DECEPTIVE DISPLAY – THE SUCTORIAL FEEDING POROSTOMATA NUDIBRANCHS

UNIQUELY UNITED BUT DECEPTIVE DISPLAY – THE SUCTORIAL FEEDING POROSTOMATA NUDIBRANCHS

UNIQUELY UNITED BUT DECEPTIVE DISPLAY The Suctorial Feeding Porostomata Nudibranchs In a previous NudiNote – The Little Scraper – the radula of sea slugs was discussed. Mention was also made of those sea slugs that do not possess a radula. Among the dorid nudibranchs in particular, the radula has only been lost once along their
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VIVA VARIATION – Hypselodoris bullockii & LOOK-ALIKES

VIVA VARIATION – Hypselodoris bullockii & LOOK-ALIKES

VIVA VARIATION Change is upsetting    Repetition is tedious.       Three cheers for variation! Mason Cooley Across all of the Sea Slugs there is an almost endless amount of variation. Different shapes, sizes, textures, patterns and colours. We aficionados of the Sea Slugs enjoy all of that variation for it gives us many
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SORTING OUT THE TRUE NUDIBRANCHS

SORTING OUT THE TRUE NUDIBRANCHS

Sorting out the True Nudibranchs   The Nudibranchs are but one order, the Nudibranchia, in the informal group that we refer to under the umbrella of Sea Slugs although common and popular usage has seen the term Nudibranchs used incorrectly to refer to all the sea slugs in general. This NudiNote is concerned just with
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THE ANAL DUALITY OF THE NUDIBRANCHIA

THE ANAL DUALITY OF THE NUDIBRANCHIA

The true nudibranchs are divided into two suborders – Suborder Cladobranchia and Suborder Doridoidea. Without doubt the most noticeable external difference between the two is in the appearance of the gills. Here we must generalise of course with the dorids having a circle of gill branches around the anus, sometimes presenting as an arc or
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WHAT PHYLLIDIID IS THAT?

WHAT PHYLLIDIID IS THAT?

Trying to decide to which genus a phyllidiid nudibranch belongs from a photo can be a task of some difficulty. There are some external features that can be used, but these are not always easily observed. Here is a rough external guide boiled down to the basics: Phyllidia – Oral tentacles separate; rhinophores cream, yellow or
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